The Emperor’s New Clothes

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There is a well-known tale about a vain Emperor who cares for nothing but his appearance and attire, who hires two tailors who are really swindlers that promise him the finest, best suit of clothes from a fabric invisible to anyone who is unfit for his position or “just hopelessly stupid”.

The Emperor cannot see the fabric himself, but pretends that he can for fear of appearing unfit for his position; his ministers do the same. When the swindlers report that the suit is finished, they mime dressing him and the Emperor then marches in procession before his subjects, who play along with the pretence.

Suddenly, a child in the crowd, too young to understand the desirability of keeping up the pretence, blurts out that the Emperor is wearing nothing at all and the cry is taken up by others. The Emperor cringes, suspecting the assertion is true, but holds up proudly and continues the procession.

Are we being fooled just like the Emperor?

What if we were all walking around naked? And no-one is saying anything as not to offend anyone, or believing they must be hopelessly stupid. Now that’s an interesting concept.

I believe we are naked. Well not in the literal term, that would be bit tricky to say the least. The tailors dressing us in today’s fable are the beliefs we hold about having no control over our physical body and leaving it to doctors to fix when something goes wrong, add to that little or no attention being paid to the mind.

The information we’re being fed is skewed in favour of Pharmaceutical and big business (supermarkets) who both just want us to buy their products.

It strikes me as very interesting that we are lead to believe that health problems/diseases are inevitable and if you haven’t got one, there’s something wrong with you. And if you believe the TV commercials the cure always seems to come with a hot guy and rolling fields of flowers, or absolutely fantastic looking people with great teeth.

We seem to think health problems and disease are normal and we see images depicting them all around us every day. Is it normal? The quick fix is one of the worst things produced and proffered in advertising today, that all we need is the latest pill, the latest diet or diet product or to get something cut out.

I want you imagine you’re driving down the highway in your brand new car. A red light comes on, on the dash board. So you pull into the next service station and ask for a hammer, and you bash the red light out, as you smile to the attendant and pass the hammer back.

We don’t do it with our cars, do we? Why do we do it with our bodies? If a red light come on in the car there’s something wrong with the motor. If a pain comes on in the body, there’s something wrong with the motor (mind).

Your body has the innate ability to heal itself. If you have a cut or a burn on your hand, or a broken bone it heals “yes”, so your body knows how to heal itself. Now if you have an internal problem, we seem to think the body won’t heal that. How does the body tell the difference between the cut, burn, broken bone and an ulcer in the stomach, or a problem with the bowel? Does it say to itself well now you’ve gone and done it! I’m not healing that one?

You see just like in the tale if you are gullible enough or vein enough to believe what a couple of dodgy tailor’s tell you, (Health marketing) you’re going to be walking around naked (unknowing), because you think if you try a new tailor you may be seen as a fool (new aged).

Just like the tale, the information we allow to dress us may not have our best interests at heart. Now this tale can’t end here though; we have the choice to dress ourselves in the morning in whatever we want, we can choose new tailors and get into some paisley or tie dyes, or how about an Armani business suit, the choice is always up to us. Seek out information on how to become more aware of your mind, and utilise its endless possibilities. The road to health and the road to happiness are 2 lanes of the same highway.

The Emperor’s New Clothes By Lyn Collett